Light smokers have the same health risks as heavy smokers

Light smokers have the same health risks as heavy smokers

Smoking has been shown to cause extensive damage to the lungs, and even occasional smokers have the same amount of lung damage as those who are addicted to the habit. Smokers have been advised by medical professionals to strive on stopping smoking in order to improve their health. Researchers from Columbia University have shown that light smokers’ lungs are far more vulnerable to harm than previously assumed. The lungs of heavy smokers, ex-smokers, and former smokers were all shown to be impaired to varying degrees.

Regular smokers’ lungs lose 11.24 ml per year in functioning, whereas light smokers’ lungs lose 7.65 ml per year, according to the study. The amount of air that a person can take in and exhale is known as lung function, and it is shown to be reduced in smokers. The lungs of light smokers begin to be impacted after a year, but the lungs of heavy smokers begin to be harmed after nine months. Breathing capacity naturally decreases with ageing beginning in the twenties. The difference between a few cigarettes and a whole pack being smoked in a day is so little that it’s barely noticeable. Lung activity declines 1.57 millilitres per year in ex-smokers and persists for 30 years. Ex-smokers’ lungs still show anatomical changes and altered gene activity after almost a year. One of the leading causes of cancer and other lung disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, has been discovered to be smoking (COPD). Various restrictions and bans on certain goods are being implemented by the government in an effort to reduce the number of people who smoke.

Smoking kills 480,000 people each year, or one in every five premature deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These include cancers of the lung, pancreatic, bladder, mouth, and colon, which account for 36% of all fatalities in the United States. As part of the MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Tobacco Treatment Program, researchers from 2006 to 2015 helped cancer patients quit smoking. Cancer patients may benefit from such a complete therapy regimen if it aids them in quitting smoking and speeds up their recovery time.

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